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20130121
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of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
a political movement. you moved toward the freer environment of the city. you moved from the south to the north. that is what most people did. in the process of doing that some of them became politicized. >> host: because they expected things to be markedly different in the north. they didn't think racism existed in the north. >> guest: in the north they are not going to be murdered for taking a stand. and so in a relatively freer environment they are able to create the conditions for the modern movement. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. there is sncc and the clc and the others. who were the people who most move things? was a king? king? was it malcolm x? was at the death of medgar evers? was a stokely carmichael or john lewis? >> guest: all of them have different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain to students that parks made martin luther king possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give seat on that montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate well meaning baptist minister. is because of rosa parks th
in the political environment where each participant has multiple constituencies to which they're accountable in some fashion and paying attention to. and so you take the last few days, clearly in a state of play that involves positioning, and we can be critical, it's easy to be create -- critical about why that's kind of the reaction everybody always has in a labor dispute. why can't they just get in the room? they know the range of substantive outcome. it's not a secret, it's not hard to find, why can't they do it this afternoon? and similarly, observing events in the fiscal negotiations, everybody looks at it and say, well, why can't they get those four or five people around the table in the roosevelt room this afternoon and resolve it? the subsequent outline has always been there, it's been this in every private conversation with maul groups of members -- with small groups of members of congress from both sides. it's not elusive. the details can be complicated especially on issues like health care costs, but the broad outlines of a resolution of these problems are not hard or to define, a
growth a growth that is actually compatible with the sustainability of our environment and the fight against climate change. now, what does that mean for us? i remind you that in 2013 the imf is certainly stronger, better equipped financially, has certainly refined some of its analytical tools. we will continue to strengthen our surveyance, peps on spillover -- especially on spillover effects and on the financial sector. we will continue to strengthen our support for the entire spectrum of members through lending, capacity building, training, technical assistance. in other words, we are not only serving the needs of a selected group of countries, but we serve the entire membership. and when you look at the map of the world and see where our teams are whether it's in capacity building, in technical assistance, in programs associated or not with financing, we are all over the map. and we will continue to push ahead with the important and yet not completed reform of quota and governance which, as you know, includes three stages, two of which are completed, the third one not yet. and cer
their parents, their family and others and threatening them. and especially when you are in an environment of uncertainty, people say, well, international community might be leave, the security might deteriorate, so it's easier for these people to be intimidated and switch sides. also impersonation and using uniforms. i see a lot of people here that have been in kabul, and i've met them there. you can easily buy an afghan army uniform or police uniform on the market. you can even buy isaf uniforms if you're looking for it hard in kabul. so that's a part, but also copycat, mentally ill and unstable individuals like in here, sometimes you see what is an increase in the crime because people when they see something, they copy that. they think this is something cool or something acceptable. but, of course, rage and revenge, sometimes these soldiers are personally mistreated. but the last factor, of course s what they call jihad; thinking, of course, this is the right way of action. so so it's a complex phenomena, and i'm not going to go about how to deal with it. if needed, we can talk about it
that in a classroom environment with just a discussion. >> that's very important dynamics. >> so game changer, shale gas, regulation, barriers, culture, skill but i will talk about the hormones. dominant, mckinsey issue is sort of the cutting edge of looking at not only global manufacturing trends, but also trains but also trains in which are described as advanced industry. and this interesting interplay of production innovation. how do you see the landscape? >> very much with what you said at the beginning, the context of what transit is a, i think it is a shift going on. i think maybe we should start by saying too many of us, love manufacturing into one big category. there are at least five categories. i won't bore you with our views. i think the tip of it is advanced manufacturing, which is more using the data advanced materials, its nanotechnology. it's the combination of many other things, the innovation, the capabilities that this country is superbly good, the cross-cultural capability and as you said, it only is roughly around 11-12% of gdp, but it's extremely important flywheel. it accounts
is the political environment -- sorry. it can be hard to ignore, but were going to do it. another piece of the political environment, where we had the ability to fix the situation. we know to fix this. we needed a comprehensive dead deal that's big enough to stabilize the debt and we'll remember that. when you're trying to balance the budget. were not very. were not going to be there soon. you have to make sure that that's not faster than the economy and it's on a downward path and the problem is so big or too calm% year to look at every part of the budget. you have to look at defense spending. you have to clearly focused on health care costs, which go faster than the economy. we have to fix our social security system, which makes promises bigger than what we can pay out on the road. we have to raise revenues. we started down the path, but we haven't looked had to do about overhauling tax system, which would you want to raise revenue, you could do in could do in the way bad for the economy hallway discussion helps increase competitiveness and modernizes our tax system. so we know what t
that is we create a regulatory environment, tax environment, and competitive regime here in this country that actually allows our businesses and workers to win in that global wheat competitive game at the moment. we have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this f
constrained environment you wouldn't make. >> if i may need to the secretary of the needy or the chief of naval operations is to get more convictions. my mission is to ensure a fair, effective and efficient military justice system and has said, the officers are responsible for the safety, the welfare and the discipline within their command the of difficult leadership decisions to make and they make those decisions case by case, day in and day out and they try to do what's right in each case, not what's easy and what's expedient and not what is a perception of what is expected of that. >> i want to thank you all of the panelists. this concludes the briefing. it's been extremely informative to all of us, and we appreciate not only your service but your participation today. we know that there are veterans out in the back of the audience and we also want to acknowledge their service and commitment and involvement in today's process as members of the audience. i also want to personally thank the commission staff that put this together and highlight who did a spectacular job of putting toget
for political instability perhaps has increased, amplified by the deteriorating economic environment that chavez will also bequeath to his successor. so what happens next? are there some scenarios that are more likely than others? what are the implications for vens venezuela and also the international community, and what is the chavez legacy for the region? we've assembled a top flight panel, each of the panelists having deep experience in and knowledge of venezuela. our first panel cyst is russell dallen -- panelist is russell dallen. was is a journalist through and through having worked for a firm of leading publications around the world, a keen observer of the issues. he's also an effective commentator, and his views are widely sought by the press and the markets. any of you of who have followed venezuela recently have probably seen his name pop up in some of the press articles. russ is a harry suspect truman scholar which is something i like to point out whenever i can. second is charles shapiro, formerly the u.s. ambassador to venezuela. charles recently which canned a very successful tenur
good for the environment were now being planted from fence row to fence row. so by 1999 the price of corn was 50% above 1996 levels. i'm sorry, 50% below 1996 levels, and soy was down 41%. and farmers were in really major economic distress. is so there was all sorts of pressure on congress to do something. food industry lobbying meant that the policymakers didn't go back and address these problems by reinstating some supply management provisions. instead, congress used taxpayer money to keep farmers afloat so they wouldn't be putting pressure if rural areas on -- in rural areas on their members of congress. so these emergency payments were instituted in 1998. the payments were made permanent in the 2002 farm bill, and that that's how the subsidy system was born. so who are the main beneficiaries of this kind of subsidy system? it's really the food and the meat industry and the grain traders who are the winners. deregulation saves them money by allowing them to pay farmers less for their crops than it costs to produce those crops. so it's not the subsidies themselves that are actua
a family in the safe and healthy environment. they face threats that once did not exist and we at the capitol have better make sure we are helping them. not hurting them in their efforts. [applause] together we make great strides in the last four years to improve arizona's competitive position. we face the hardest of times but sustain and strengthen state government through the downturn. per capita, arizona has the second number of state employees of all states. [applause] reformed our personnel system they will have a -- motivated by performance and accountable. [applause] we have passed meaningful reform to pass our education system and expand school choice. we limited regulation and enacted the a largest and most tax cut in the state history. unlike our friends in washington, d.c. [applause] and we even accomplished something novel and rare in politics. we kept our word. in 2010, we asked the people to increase their own taxes and promised them it would be temporary. that promise will be kept when proposition 100 sales taxes inpyres in may -- expires in may. [applause] not l
something very different. the individual if you would have taught that in a classroom environment adjust a discussion on -- [inaudible] that's very important dynamic there. >> game changer, shell gas, more regulation, barrier, culture. i want to talk about the here mowns. [laughter] mcken city is about the cutting age looking at not only global manufacturing trends but trends you're describing advanced industry. and innovation. how do you see it? >> i think very much is said at the beginning of the context claus. there's a shift doing on. i think we should start by saying too many of us lump manufacturing in to one big category. i think there are at least five categories. i won't bore with them. i think the tip is the advanced manufacturing which is more using big data. it's advanced material. it's nano technology. it's the combination of many of the things the innovation capabilities that this country is good at the cross functional capability. as you said, it's -- it's roughly around 11 to 12% of gdp. it's extremely important fly wheel. it accounts, football we think, a third of the u.
, but making some judgments. you're going to have a consensus which is more typical of the urban environment. you're going to go into -- let's get back to laura. let's go back to bring the communities in and around or, colorado, what i think is an important conversation because i think you will find there is probably more consensus around the country for what we refer to as responsible common-sense gun legislation that complement's. we will also find in republican areas a lot of support for after-school programs. you will find a lot of that. so i think part of the way you get good at continuing that conversation, i would say that you dispel the cultural barriers. is very different to your reaction in montana. >> came to the staff to go fishing. as kid to my branch manager who is an avid outdoorsman and quite a political, owns a lot of guns but primarily traditional bow hunter. i said, rham emmanuel is coming. oh, my god. i've got to go hide my guns. and we left about this. they're going to love your guns. >> the secret service. >> the secret service came and they spend a lot of time. they ca
are very important to try to create this environment is most appropriate. that is what we are doing. there are potential risks and inflation was mentioned. we have obviously used an expansionary monetary policy and we have increased the amount of reserves that banks hold with the bad. there are some people that think that that will be inflationary. personally i don't see much evidence of that. inflation, as i mentioned, has been quite low. expectations remain anchored. private sector forecasters do not seek any inflation coming up, and in particular, we have, i believe, with all the tools that we need to undo our monetary policy stimulus and to take that away for inflation becomes a problem. so i do not believe that you can inflation is going to be a result of any of us. that being said i stability -- in terms of stability, it is well maintained. the other thing worth mentioning is financial ability. this is a difficult issue. the concern has been raised by keeping interest rates very low that the federal reserve induces people to take greater risks in their financial investments, a
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15